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In a recent global survey of 600 IT decision makers, Mimecast found that 88% view email as critical to their organization with 55% saying email is mission-critical. This isn’t surprising; email is often the first thing we check in the morning and the last thing we check before going to bed. Any email disruption can bring productivity to a screeching halt—severely impacting customer service, preventing new sales, and impacting day-to-day operations.

Mimecast is pleased to release new Continuity Event Management features designed to ease the challenges of identifying, diagnosing and responding to mail flow problems on Microsoft Office 365™, Microsoft Exchange™ or G Suite by Google Cloud™. When every second counts, Mimecast reduces the time to respond to email disruptions so organizations can avoid the problems caused when this critical infrastructure isn’t working.

Mimecast Continuity Event Management features enable administrators to:

Monitor –Mimecast monitors for high latency and failed deliveries, both inbound and outbound, so admins stay on top of potential issues.

Alert – Organization specific thresholds for mail flow give administrators the ability to tailor when they are notified. Once a threshold is met, an automated alert is generated and sent via SMS or to an alternate email address. Administrators are alerted to problems on any device, anywhere.

Respond – A fast response continuity event portal provides the administrator with key metrics on the mail flow problem and gives details to quickly assess the severity of the problem. One-click activation starts continuity, with Mimecast sending and receiving email until the primary system can be recovered independently. An SMS message to employees reduces manual tasks and ensures the employee base follows company procedures.

Whether your organization operates on-premises, from the cloud or in a hybrid environment, problems still do occur. By analyzing customer data, Mimecast finds that 11% of detected outages were due to server or service issues that lasted 24 hours. Another example is the June 30, 2016 mail disruption of Microsoft Office 365™ which lasted for over nine hours on the last day of the month and last day of the quarter across most tenants in the United States.

No company can predict when a mail flow problem will arise and as the Office 365 incident points out, any disruption during a critical time can have widespread consequences. With the new features, available March 2017, Mimecast makes it easier to detect and manage mail flow disruptions.

Learn more about Mimecast’s leading Mailbox Continuity service and new event management features.

Related Content: Mimecast Enhances Cyber Resilience Capabilities To Improve Uptime For Organizations Facing Email Disruptions

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A long time ago, a supercomputer named Deep Thought concluded that the answer to the ultimate question to the meaning of life, the universe, and everything was 42. Although it took Deep Thought 7 and a half million years to produce this answer, it concluded that finding the answer would have been much simpler had it known the question. Deep Thought didn't understand what the "ultimate question" was. And we'll agree; it's definitely hard to provide an answer without a question. Here at Mimecast though, we have the question…the ultimate question…42 of them to be exact!

Join us as we get to know our Mimecast experts in a new blog series called “42 Questions.” We may not find out the answer to life at the end, but we’ll definitely find the answer to what our expert thinks it means to be a Mimecaster, the top security threats they worry about, and even their favorite superhero just to name a few. That should hold us over while we come to a consensus on why 42 is the answer to the meaning of life, the universe, and everything! Enjoy!

 

Video Script below:

JLW: I’m Jamie Whalen, Social Media Manager at Mimecast and we’re here with J. Peter Bruzzese, a Mimecast employee and Microsoft MVP. We will be asking him a set of 42 quick rapid response questions to get to know who J. Peter is just a little bit more.  Are you ready for 42 questions?

J.PETER:  You bet- “Greetings Mimecast and Jamie!”

 

1. What is your MVP Technical expertise?

Awarded 7 times, first 4 times was for exchange 2nd two times was for Office 365. And to put it all into one bucket, the office service, and services bucket.

2. Favorite actress?

Amy Adams

3. Favorite movie?

Rocky I, II, III

4. Infrastructure or Software as a service? 

Software.  Infrastructure is very legacy facing which is still necessary for a hybrid move to cloud but with container and such along with SaaS really providing what most organization need… I see SaaS as the real future in 5 years’ time.

5. Favorite food?

Anything parmesan.  Chicken, eggplant, etc.

 6. Why do you consult for Mimecast?

When I was first looking at Office 365, I liked it but I felt like there was a need for something else to fix all of the gaps in Office 365. And so, in looking around, the only solution I found that could fill the gap of security, archiving, availability, was Mimecast. And so I decided to work for them.

(Want to see the sleep chambers?  They encourage napping!!! I’m a huge fan of napping.)

 7. Typical bedtime?

Good question. Any time after midnight.

8.  Bed attire?

Pajama bottoms and a t-shirt (either incredible Hulk shirt or some other superhero).

9.  Scariest place you’ve ever been? 

I lived in Ciudad del Este Paraguay for a year.  It’s on the border of Brazil and Argentina.  It had its scary moments.

10. Nicest place you’ve ever been?

Ariel de Cabo, an area right above Rio de Jenario.

11. How many languages do you speak? 

One – English.  But I can also hold conversations in Spanish, Portuguese and Mandarin.

12. Say something in Mandarin?  

Wo de mingze Li Xiao Lung.

13. What did you just say? 

My name is Bruce Lee.

14. Favorite sci-fi weapon? 

Lightsaber

15. Coolest career moment?  

First published book in my hands and the first time I was awarded the MVP for Exchange.

16. Favorite third party bolt-on solution for Exchange on-prem or online? 

Mimecast (look around!)

17. Facebook or Twitter?

Twitter. I don’t do Facebook.

18. Top 3 security threats you worry about?

Spear phishing, Ransomware, Impersonation wire transfer hoaxes. 

19. Coolest party game? 

Binary Code Conversion.  It’s where you take decimal numbers and convert them to binary and vice versa.  How’s that for geeky?

20. Favorite superhero?

Marvel- the Hulk. But if you’re talking about DC- Superman.

21. Coolest tech person you’ve met? 

(Take out iPhone and show picture of Steve Wozniak)  Steve Wozniak.

22. If you could go to Mars would you do it? 

Absolutely not… have you seen the Martian?  Yeah… no thanks.

23. What’s your favorite color?

Silver

24. Least favorite color?

Teal

25. Favorite tech gadget you can’t get enough of?

The Halolens.

26. Favorite comedian?

Kevin James

27. How would you describe the last election?

Well… I’m neutral but I did hear someone call it a Kobiyashi Maru… and that was funny.

28. Favorite number?

42

29. What’s your favorite part of Office 365?

Exchange Online

30. What’s your least favorite part of Office 365?

Yammer

 (Hey, I heard someone you knew made something here, what and where is it? – enter Parson’s Green)

31. Who built this table?

John Dickey, the owner of the Timberguys.  Really awesome stuff.

32. Favorite part of the Mimecast space?

This table in the Parson’s Green room. Believe it or not, the wood came from a boat that was owned by Louis Boxer.

33. How do you know him?

We went to school together.

34. How would you describe yourself?

Two words:  driven and passionate

35. Who makes you laugh?

My wife.

36. What’s keeping you busy these days?

A lot of traveling, talking about cyber resilience and risk mitigation. Specifically with Office 365. With the many threats that are facing the world, you need something on the front end of Office 365 to help provide mitigation and that resiliency. Speaking about here in the states, UK, and Canada.

37. What is a great enhancement a company can assist with, a third party bolt-on enhancement?

Mimecast is one. The enhancements that Mimecast can assist with is really amazing. It’s not just a siloed solution, Mimecast was developed in the cloud, not ported into the cloud. And, they hit upon security, archiving, continuity. Hitting on all things 0365, which really hits on everything you would need to be successful. Mimecast is the only solution I have found that can do that.

38. What’s something you can’t do?

Sing.

39. What do you like best about Mimecast?

Well as a solution, Mimecast is something that provides a full blanket of resiliency. Mimecast is security, archiving, continuity. It protects you from the bad guys, and if something goes wrong it’s the continuity that keeps you up and running. The fact that you can continue to be up and running no matter what is something that Mimecast can give you.

40. What’s the best gift you’ve received?

My two children.  A boy who’s 9 and a girl who’s 6.

41. Dogs or cats?

Dogs, I’m allergic to cats.

 42. Last question, what’s the best part about being a Mimecaster?

The best part is the people, the people at Mimecast they work hard, are very diligent. They are committed to providing cyber resiliency to their customers. I think it’s fantastic. But hands down, it’s the people that make Mimecast.

Stay tuned for a new 42 questions coming up in February. Where you’ll get to know Mimecast a little bit better.

 

 

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1992 Just Emailed; It Wants Its Archiving Architecture Back

by Achmad Chadran - Product Marketing Manager, Marketing

Is your archiving solution out of date?

Can we be honest? Most email archiving platforms in use today are obsolete. The way we use email today has completely changed, and these platforms no longer do what you need them to do. 

Archiving solutions need to preserve data and simplify search and e-discovery. Most archiving platforms use the familiar on-premises architecture based on software, server and storage. Like most on-premises architectures, there’s a disaster recovery layer, usually a backup-and-recovery platform.

This architecture was designed in the early 1990s. At the time, the World Wide Web was in its infancy. Payphones were everywhere. And email was a text-based store-and-forward messaging medium.

 

Today’s email is everything and everywhere

Fast-forward to 2017: what does the world look like now? First, email has far surpassed phone as the primary business communication medium. The average user sends and receives over 122 emails each day. Second: mobility. BYOD is our new normal. And third: 86% of workers recently surveyed say they use email to share files.

Email is a collaboration tool, a workflow tool, and a file management system.

You can probably see where I’m going with this, right? So many of us are vainly trying to force 2017 email into a 1990s archiving architecture. This makes archiving costly and labor-intensive. It requires constant software upgrades, hardware refreshes, and storage expansions.

What about search and e-discovery? These take forever, bogged down by the deluge of messages and attachments that this architecture never set out to address.

Mobility? Nope. Not in the original scope.

 

The remedy: true cloud archiving

Here’s what you need archive effectively in a today’s email-dominated business world: an independent, immutable cloud archive layer. One that leverages true cloud scale and cloud economy. With dedicated resources for threat scanning, applying retention policies, running search and e-discovery, and all the other specialized archiving functions.

Now what do you get? Excellent cost profile. Excellent search – average completion times under 2 seconds and a 7-second SLA. And mobility by design, with native apps for Android, iPhone, Blackberry, and Windows Phone.

A secure, cloud-based archive that’s separate and independent from production email.

What’s the bottom line? One of our customers, a large retailer, tells us they save $70K annually in TCO compared to their previous archiving platform, and 15% in the time they need for email maintenance. And – something you likely won’t hear about from other archiving solutions – a law firm reports a 66% improvement in end-user productivity. This firm requires all of its attorneys and support staff to run Mimecast on their desktops and their smartphones.

These are the reasons you need Mimecast archiving to properly manage email, the single most essential resource you rely upon.

The question remains: where are you in your archiving journey? Download your complimentr copy of the 2016 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Information Archiving report.

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Recently, the State of New York has taken steps towards passing the nation’s first cybersecurity regulation which explicitly tells financial organizations in New York what they must do in their security program.  You can read an overview of this in the article, “Full Employment for CISOs in New York.” 

The main question I have is, does it make sense to legislate the details of a security program versus allowing organizations to build programs that meet the business needs and risk tolerance of their organizations? 

Before I answer that question, let me first state that overall, I believe the directives in the regulation generally make sense.  In fact, they are practices that most security professionals would have as part of their standard operating procedures.  It is a little odd though that they explicitly call out two technology areas – multi-factor authentication and encryption – for inclusion, while staying very high-level on the other security control areas.  Again, not that multi-factor authentication and encryption are bad areas to focus on, but why are those included and while other important security controls, such as email security, Web security, anti-virus, identity management, and many other security categories?

Now back to the main question of this blog, is legally requiring specific security practices a good thing?  My take is no.  However, should regulators consider cybersecurity as part of their supervisory responsibilities?  Yes, as part of their view of the organization’s risk management program.  Ultimately, organizations are responsible for their own risk management programs and how much risk they can tolerate and how best to mitigate that risk. 

Just as regulators don’t direct in detail other aspects of the organization’s business practices, nor should they do it for their cyber risk management practices.  There are just too many opportunities for unintended consequences to arise.  For example in my experience the more detailed the regulation, it not only becomes overwhelming for the CISO looking to implement, but there’s also a greater chance that the security program turns into a checklist program and not a risk management focused one. 

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