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In a recent global survey of 600 IT decision makers, Mimecast found that 88% view email as critical to their organization with 55% saying email is mission-critical. This isn’t surprising; email is often the first thing we check in the morning and the last thing we check before going to bed. Any email disruption can bring productivity to a screeching halt—severely impacting customer service, preventing new sales, and impacting day-to-day operations.

Mimecast is pleased to release new Continuity Event Management features designed to ease the challenges of identifying, diagnosing and responding to mail flow problems on Microsoft Office 365™, Microsoft Exchange™ or G Suite by Google Cloud™. When every second counts, Mimecast reduces the time to respond to email disruptions so organizations can avoid the problems caused when this critical infrastructure isn’t working.

Mimecast Continuity Event Management features enable administrators to:

Monitor –Mimecast monitors for high latency and failed deliveries, both inbound and outbound, so admins stay on top of potential issues.

Alert – Organization specific thresholds for mail flow give administrators the ability to tailor when they are notified. Once a threshold is met, an automated alert is generated and sent via SMS or to an alternate email address. Administrators are alerted to problems on any device, anywhere.

Respond – A fast response continuity event portal provides the administrator with key metrics on the mail flow problem and gives details to quickly assess the severity of the problem. One-click activation starts continuity, with Mimecast sending and receiving email until the primary system can be recovered independently. An SMS message to employees reduces manual tasks and ensures the employee base follows company procedures.

Whether your organization operates on-premises, from the cloud or in a hybrid environment, problems still do occur. By analyzing customer data, Mimecast finds that 11% of detected outages were due to server or service issues that lasted 24 hours. Another example is the June 30, 2016 mail disruption of Microsoft Office 365™ which lasted for over nine hours on the last day of the month and last day of the quarter across most tenants in the United States.

No company can predict when a mail flow problem will arise and as the Office 365 incident points out, any disruption during a critical time can have widespread consequences. With the new features, available March 2017, Mimecast makes it easier to detect and manage mail flow disruptions.

Learn more about Mimecast’s leading Mailbox Continuity service and new event management features.

Related Content: Mimecast Enhances Cyber Resilience Capabilities To Improve Uptime For Organizations Facing Email Disruptions

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Office 365™ Extends Lead in Cloud Adoption

by David Hood - Director, Technology Marketing, Mimecast

A recent survey confirms that Microsoft Office 365 continues to outpace Google’s G Suite in the race to the cloud. Overall it’s clear that more organizations are using cloud or hybrid deployment models over on-premises, but let’s dig into the survey results.

Let’s start with the Bitglass Cloud Adoption Report, which is in its third iteration, for some context into how things have changed over the years. In 2014, the report found that 16% of organizations were using Google Apps for Work (now rebranded G Suite). At that time, only about 8% were found to be on Office 365. Google at that point had a 2X lead on Microsoft! Since then, the picture has changed dramatically. In 2015, Office 365 closed the gap and squeaked past to take a 25% to 23% lead. The ’16 report saw that lead extend as Office 365 now controls a commanding 35% to 24% advantage. Bitglass says this report was created using an internally-developed tool that analyzed over 120,000 companies.

We’ve also heard that cloud adoption is progressing faster than industry experts originally expected. In the spring of 2016, Redmond Magazine reported on a recently completed Gartner survey showing Office 365 was either in use or planning to be used in the next six months by 78% of respondents. This is up 13% from two years ago when the survey was run last. What’s interesting is that the use of Exchange on-premises only dropped by 5%, with most feeling that hybrid environments will remain popular and persist well into the future.

It’s no surprise to hear that Office 365 continues to gain ground and extend their advantage in corporate accounts. I’ve referenced before that Office 365 adds 50,000 customers a month and as of June 2016, that was true for 28 straight months! What’s more, the service has been growing by about 40% year-over-year and looks poised to top 120 million corporate users by this time next year. Interested in learning more about how organizations are managing risk while moving to the cloud? Check out this market trend report by Microsoft MVP J. Peter Bruzzese titled, Resetting Your Expectations on Office 365.

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Adoption of Office 365 continues to grow rapidly, adding 50,000 customers a month, with Exchange email remaining the number one workload. At the same time, increasing regulation, litigation, and operational drivers necessitate the need for speedy, accurate and complete access to email data.

Email archiving has long been recognized as a key mechanism to meet these needs. Historically this was achieved on-premise alongside the mail server, but more recently has started to shift to the cloud in order to achieve economic and operational benefits. As email moves to the cloud, organizations must consider how to appropriately protect their data. Remembering that it’s their data, and responsibility ultimately sits with them to safeguard it, is critical.

With over 16% of Mimecast customers now using Office 365 for email, we’re often asked about what to look for in an email archive – specifically for protecting critical Exchange Online data. The following six critical considerations summarize the advice we give.

 

   1. Email data should be immutable by default

All inbound and outbound mail, including detailed metadata, should be captured and stored automatically for all users – without the need for manual or scripted processes. A true enterprise-grade email archive should be designed from the outset as a long term, compliance-driven archive with immutable (WORM) storage and strong chains of custody. In this case, data cannot be modified or removed until the pre-defined retention period is reached.

A suitable archive allows for an independent, always-on, verifiable copy of data to be stored outside of the operational Office 365 infrastructure.

While Office 365’s in-place or litigation holds may satisfy some organizations’ requirements to preserve mailbox data, both were conceived to provide data preservation for active, ongoing litigation – not as a long-term immutable archive.

Mailboxes are not placed on litigation or in-place hold automatically - this is a manual task and can get inadvertently forgotten or misconfigured. Any mailbox content not on hold can be tampered with or deleted.

 

   2. Search speed and consistency

The explosion in the amount of data stored by most organizations along with stricter regulation and increased litigation requires a suitable storage architecture to ensure rapid and accurate archive search results. A dedicated, cloud-based grid storage architecture is best suited to this task so that archive searches benefit from the aggregate power of all servers in the storage grid, together with a unified index, to deliver consistent results at superfast speed.

There should be no limit to the number of mailboxes that can be searched and the number of searches that can be run concurrently. E-discovery searches should not be impacted by email system downtime.

With Exchange Online, users are connected to a single server and data store. Large deployments likely mean multiple servers and data stores – each with its own index. Mailboxes are spread automatically across servers.

As a result, e-discovery searches could require access to hundreds of servers and indexes – potentially liable to inconsistent search results, e.g. server busy, server down, and incomplete index (e.g. unsupported file types, indexing errors).

Search speed is limited by individual Exchange server performance – each with multiple competing workloads. There are limits on both the number of mailboxes (10,000) and the number of e-discovery searches that can be run at the same time.

 

   3. Minimize and limit specialized and manual admin tasks

Initial setup and ongoing administrator actions should all be managed through a single web-based graphical user interface (GUI). This negates the need for manual scripting which is more likely to result in misconfiguration and command errors that can result in significant data loss. Remember, humans are often the weakest link in the chain.

Organizations should also ensure that no single administrator should be able to change key archive policies such as retention duration. This could increase the chances of accidental or malicious actions having a potentially devastating impact.

There are certain admin actions in Office 365 that can only be achieved through PowerShell commands, such as applying a litigation hold to all mailboxes at once, or in-place hold to more than 500 mailboxes. Misconfiguration and errors are arguably more likely in these manual processes.

A single Exchange administrator can remove a hold.

 

   4. Auditing must provide the details needed

Audit logs are vital to check and prove historical actions for both operational and legal purposes. Logs should be enabled by default and retained in perpetuity in order to ensure a complete record. The details logged must also be sufficient for the purposes they may be needed for. The logs should be held in a secure location accessible only to those with appropriate privileges.

In Office 365, auditing of admin actions is enabled by default and cannot be switched off. However, these logs are only kept for 90 days by default and do not include some actions, such as when messages are accessed or deleted, or the client or source details.

Mailbox audit logs must be manually setup and enabled per mailbox using PowerShell. These logs are stored in the target mailbox and could be deleted if the mailbox is deleted.

 

   5. Seamless employee archive access from anywhere

The amount of critical data in email is growing rapidly, with archives increasingly used by employees as their primary repository to save and access important information. In fact, Gartner[1] estimates that by 2019, 75% of organizations will treat archive data, including email, as an active data source.

Seamless and rapid access to this archive data from any device is, therefore, critical. Consistent access should be available via Outlook, the web, and mobile devices. Archive searches must be virtually instant to satisfy employee expectations. Almost 200,000 archive searches a month are made by Mimecast customer employees using the Mimecast Mobile app alone, demonstrating the importance of having easy access to archived content when out of the office. Mimecast offers an industry leading 7-second search SLA.

Microsoft provides archive access via Outlook, Outlook on the web, Mac and iPad only. There is currently no support for iPhone or Android – the two most popular smartphone platforms globally. There is no Office 365 archive search SLA offered.

 

   6. Avoid mailbox lock-in

When archive data is held in a separate platform and location to operational email data, not only does this support compliance and regulatory requirements, it means that the primary mail platform can be changed without the roadblock of finding a viable way to extract data first (or risk losing it). It also provides continuity of access during mailbox migration projects.

Ask yourself. Will a move to Office 365 be the last time you change mailbox providers? Unlikely.

Office 365’s inline archive stores primary and archived mailboxes in the same single environment. With all email data in Office 365, it becomes more difficult to switch to another email environment – essentially leading to Office 365 lock-in. Tony Redmond, a Microsoft MVP and leading commentator expands on this situation in his article ‘Getting data into Office 365 is easy; not so straightforward to retrieve’.

Microsoft gives you 90 days to extract all your data before its permanently deleted following expiration or termination of an Office 365 subscription.

 

You can learn more about Mimecast email archiving and how we support a move to Office 365 on our website.

 

 

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[1] Gartner Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Information Archiving, Nov 2014

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Episode 3: ILTACON Event, Washington DC
 

 

J. Peter, where are you?

Greetings!  J .Peter here and this week I’m in Washington DC.  DC is an amazing town with so many historical locations museums to visit.  I had a chance to see the White House (from the outside of course), the Washington Monument and a few Smithsonian museums.

 

Incidentally, a little bit of trivia here, the Washington monument is two different colors.  The base started in 1848 but the building stopped from 1854 to 1877 due to funding issues and… well… the Civil War.  When they started again the marble color was slightly different.

 

Why are you there?

I’m here in Washington DC to speak at ILTACON 2016 at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center.  ILTACON is a technology conference focused on law firms and legal departments.  The folks running the conference apparently read an article I wrote in InfoWorld about the gotchas of Office 365 and asked if I would come and give an Office 365 session.

 

What are you there for?

The session I’m giving is entitled: Office 365: Where do you start?

It covers the three main questions I’m often asked by folks regarding Office 365.  Should we move to Office 365?  How do we move to Office 365?  What are the gotchas (aka buyers remorse) concerns when moving to Office 365? 

Personally, I love what Microsoft has done with Office 365.  It’s a fantastic solution with flexible price points depending on your needs.  That doesn’t mean I recommend it for everyone.  But I think it’s obvious that it’s the future email solution for most enterprise customers.  With how to make the move I discussed the decisions that need to be made.  Do I do a cutover or a hybrid staged migration?  Do I use a third-party migration solution?  Do I pull in consultants for the hybrid configuration?  If I go with a hybrid do I determine self/same or single sign on and then do I go with ADFS or some kind of third-party solution like Okta or Centrify?  With the gotchas of a migration… what do I do with my legacy archive solution?  And then with post-migration gaps… what about my security with Office 365?  How do I maintain continuity or availability of services even when Office 365 is down?

The session was not a product pitch for Mimecast by any means but I made sure to point out where Mimecast fills the gaps with regard to security, archiving and continuity.  Mimecast had a booth at the event so I was able to point them off to the Mimecast folks for more information.  In addition, we gave out copies of the Conversational Geek book sponsored by Mimecast entitled “Conversational Office 365 Risk Mitigation” which just had a 2nd Edition release this week and you’re welcome to download the book directly with the link provided here

It was a great event.  I had a chance to talk to a lot of folks moving toward Office 365, many with some trepidation, and I was able to allay those fears by helping them appreciate that just like our on-premises Exchange, there is an ecosystem of third-party solutions that can assist in enhancing what Microsoft is providing.

Hey, I hope you’ve enjoyed following me to Washington DC.

Where am I going next?  Your roadmap says Atlanta Georgia for Ignite.  But I might just surprise you folks with a bonus stop!

 

Related Content

Road Show Podcast: Episode 1

Infographic: Road Show Podcast 2016

5 Questions To Ask Before Selecting Office 365™

Related Services

Mimecast Services For Office 365

 

 

 

 

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