Matthew Gardiner

by Matthew Gardiner

Senior Product Marketing Manager

Posted Feb 14, 2017

Would it surprise you to learn that in recent testing Mimecast has seen a 13.2% false negative rate for incumbent email security systems?  Does your current email security system let through an inordinate amount of spam, malware, malicious URLs, or impersonation emails? 

Security Risk Assessment

How would you find out if it did?  Is your primary source for detecting false negatives your users? Do you wonder how your email security performance compares with your peers?

The fact is, until now, there hasn’t been much data comparing or benchmarking the performance of email security systems. They all claim the ability to defend against spam, malware, spear-phishing, malicious links and other email attack techniques. But how good are they really? How do they compare in their ability to block opportunistic email-borne attacks as well as more targeted attacks?

In working with our more than 25,000 customers, Mimecast has seen firsthand that email security systems do not perform equally well. To address this lack of data head-on, Mimecast launched its Email Security Risk Assessment (ESRA).

 

The Mimecast ESRA has three goals:

  1. To test the Mimecast cloud security service against an individual organization’s incumbent email security system. To help the organization see in one report the number, type, and severity of email-borne threats that are currently getting into their organization.
  2. To inform the security industry with hard data on the effectiveness of various commonly-deployed, email security systems.
  3. To inform the security industry with hard data regarding the number, type, and severity of email-borne threats that are actively being used in attacks.

In an ESRA, Mimecast uses its cloud-based Advanced Security service to assess the effectiveness of other email security systems. The ESRA test passively inspects emails that have been inspected by the organization’s incumbent email security system and received by their email management system. In an ESRA, the Mimecast service re-inspects the emails deemed safe by the incumbent email security system and thus looks for false negatives, such as spam, malicious files, and impersonation emails.

The results we’ve uncovered so far are concerning:  Email attacks ranging from opportunistic spams to highly-targeted impersonation attacks are getting through incumbent email security systems both in large number and in various types.

To learn more and to see the results of the ESRA tests completed to date, please check out this paper.

 

Matthew Gardiner

by Matthew Gardiner

Senior Product Marketing Manager

Posted Feb 14, 2017

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