From Good to Great – Why Office 365 Needs Mimecast

From the moment BPOS was first released about five years ago, we’ve consistently said on this blog that we welcome Microsoft’s move to the cloud, that it’ll be a great solution for some businesses, but that mature cloud services like Mimecast’s will play a major role as adoption begins to gain momentum. Well, if BPOS was Microsoft’s trial run, Office 365 is the real deal and it does now seem to be gaining serious traction in the market. But our position remains the same, and in fact the business case for Mimecast’s solutions to enhance Office 365 looks stronger than ever.

Office 365 is positioned by Microsoft as a one-stop-shop, and on the surface looks like something of a panacea for a business looking to outsource email and stop managing an on-premises Exchange server. For many businesses, particularly in the SMB space, it is.

But for larger companies, or those for whom email is a mission critical application, Office 365 may not be quite so alluring. In general, Mimecast customers fall into that category – they want to use best practice cloud services to protect email from threats, and store the data in a secure, highly available archive. And amongst our customer base we’ve seen a preference for keeping Exchange on-site – there’s strong interest in Exchange 13 – or moving to a hybrid model with some mailboxes on-site and others in the cloud.

The blockers to Office 365 adoption seem to fall into three categories.

  • Archiving doesn’t offer sufficient levels of compliance and eDiscovery capabilities
  • Uptime is a concern
  • Exchange Online Protection may not represent best practice email security

We also think a further need will emerge, for a single archive of multiple types of unstructured data, fully searchable both for eDiscovery purposes and for day to day use by end users from their laptops, smart-phones and tablets. An Enterprise Information Archive for Office 365, to use Gartner terminology.

For Mimecast, then, nothing much changes from how we position around on-premise Exchange, where we offer enterprise grade cloud services that remove complexity and cost. With Office 365, it’s less about cost and complexity, and more about the ‘enterprise grade’ piece. As Office 365 adoption gains traction, the ‘pain points’ will also crystallize, and the ecosystem of ‘supporting’ or ‘enhancing’ services will emerge.  It already is emerging.

Is this a bad thing for Microsoft or Office 365?  On the contrary. Businesses who want to go down this path will be reassured that there’s a third party ecosystem of mature cloud services that can enhance the ‘off-the-shelf’ capabilities of the various SKUs of Microsoft’s new cloud solution. We expect to find businesses buying Office 365 plus Mimecast for any one of the three issues above, or potentially buying our entire UEM suite if that’s what best meets their needs. And we also expect companies who’ve already moved to Office 365 to subsequently purchase add-on services to shore up functionality in those key areas, be they compliance or security related, or based on concerns about downtime.

So, to conclude, Office 365 comes in a variety of different shapes and sizes at different price points, ostensibly for businesses with different messaging requirements. It covers a lot of ground, and for many businesses the barrier to purchase is that one or other area of critical functionality doesn't quite meet requirements. With Mimecast, which works seamlessly within an Office 365 / Exchange context, these perceived short-falls can be fixed, and the barriers to purchase removed. With Mimecast, Office 365 goes from good to great.