Cloud based continuity insures against migration mishaps

Any business that’s been through a migration at least once will remember that most of the migration effort was spent in planning. Otherwise they may remember the large mop-up operation and the time spent visiting desktops, recovering mail and rolling aspects of the migration backwards and forwards.

Exchange migrations tend to be complex.  Even smaller organizations running Small Business Server with less than 75 users, may take a week or more to plan, prepare and execute their email migration.

Data loss (what PSTs?), client upgrades and wrongly migrated data tend to come to mind when thinking about what can go wrong, as well as the mail server that crashed during the migration. During a migration a fair amount of change is introduced and additional processing is forced onto both the source and target Exchange platform. For an older platform at the limits of its lifespan or operational capacity, the extra overhead an email migration introduces may be the straw that breaks the camel’s back.

Cloud based email continuity may act as insurance in this regard by enabling client continuity and transactional continuity in case the migration wobbles or breaks. Let’s explore that in a bit more detail.

Migrations are heavily process driven. In order to migrate, a fair amount of surveying, planning, lab testing, etc need to be accomplished. It makes sense to use the desktop visit of the plan/survey component to introduce the agents required onto the desktops in order to make client continuity possible.

If an Exchange server in the source or the target organization were to fail during the migration, Outlook clients would be redirected to the cloud, with little or no disruption to service or - crucially - the user experience. This allows the outage to be addressed, mail flow and client mail service to be restored without the pressure of fighting two fires concurrently – ie, a broken environment and a broken migration.

Cloud based email continuity allows you to benefit from the scale of the cloud as a side effect of leveraging continuity in the cloud, provided of course your users have the  required network or internet connectivity to beat a path to the cloud.

In our day to day lives we're generally quite comfortable accepting the argument of personal insurance, which guards us against any number of possible scenarios, such as breaking a leg while skiing, medical insurance, insurance against theft, and so on. All of these boil down to paying a small amount of money to a much larger entity and thereby being guaranteed the benefit of that entity's scale and reach in the case of something unfortunate happening.

As the idea of cloud on demand becomes more pervasive, insuring your migration in the short term against loss of email continuity makes as much sense as taking out insurance on your car before you take it on the road.